NEMO

Navigating European Marine Observer

APPLICATION

  • Autonomous operation
  • Self-adjustable maximum operational
    depth of 2000 m
  • Customization of measurement parameters
  • Application under ice and delayed data transfer
  • Data transfer via satellite and
    GPS positioning and tracking while drifting at surface
  • Fully programmable and
    easy software update
  • Modular physical and
    bio-geochemical sensor assemblage
  • Positioning via RAFOS hydrophones under water

 

The NEMO Platform

Collection of oceanographic data during experiments on research vessels is expensive because of the requirement for technical support and high instrumentation and operational costs. Furthermore, predictive power is limited by the narrow spatial and temporal coverage that can be achieved during such an experiment. The introduction of satellite sensors during the last two decades has enhanced capabilities for  global measurement and understanding of near-surface processes in the ocean. However, complex deep-water circulation and transportation processes can not be interpreted from remote sensors. Long-term high-frequency in-situ data throughout the water column are needed to explain such processes.

Profiling autonomous sensors that can be deployed from ship or aircraft are an ideal platform for autonomous sensors. Once deployed, they can provide data on relevant physical and biogeochemical oceanographic parameters along regular profiles for at least several months. These platforms are deployed in the ARGO program which is part of the integrated global observation strategy.  

Modular Sensor Integration

OPTIMARE has developed the NEMO-Float based on the successful design of the SOLO-Floats from Scripps Institute of Oceanography, La Jolla, California.

Typical sensors which can be integrated in the NEMO platform are used for the measurement of salinity, temperature, depth, oxygen, underwater radiance and irradiance fields (AOPs), fluorescence and attenuation of in-water optical properties (IOPs), and the sound signals in the ocean. The GPS and RAFOS can be used for the positioning of the NEMO-Float. Data transfer to a land-base is available via satellite communication. In addition, data validation and post-processing can be offered.

OPTIMARE has developed the NEMO-Float based on the successful design of the SOLO-Floats from Scripps Institute of Oceanography, La Jolla, California and in cooperation with the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research (work group Dr. O. Boebel).

The development was funded through EFRE of the EU and the Land Bremen according to grant number 5602-Z by the BIS Bremerhaven Gesellschaft für Investionsförderung mbH.